Ways to repel horse flies


Look on any ivermectin or moxidectin-based wormer packet and you’ll see a long list of parasites. Tucked in neatly at the end – it’s nearly always at the end – you’ll see the words Onchocerca Microfilariae, otherwise known as neck threadworms.

Also known as neck threadworms, these critters vary in length from 6cm to 30cm (think the length of a regular ruler). Astonishingly, they live in the horse’s nuchal ligament.

Yes, the nuchal ligament. It runs the full length of the neck, from poll to withers, with a flat ligament part connecting with the cervical vertebrae.

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Why do their bites hurt so bad? Why won’t they just die when you smack the crap out of them? Today we answer your most burning horsefly questions.

Do horseflies serve a purpose in the animal kingdom or were they just put on this earth to make me and my horses miserable?

Great question. When I think of horseflies, I think of the big, nasty, bullet-shaped monster-bugs that seem to enjoy eating my horse alive, but there actually roughly some 4,500 species belonging to the horsefly family ( Tabanidae). They live all over the world, pollinating flowers and, in their spare time, driving people and livestock insane. Other reasons to hate them: They’re vectors of disease, notably Equine Infectious Anemia, and left uncontrolled 20-30 horseflies can drain almost a third of a pint of blood from their victims in as little as six hours.

Sometimes, slow internet is the universe’s way of telling you to go play outside. Other times, it’s the universe’s cruel joke to destroy your productivity. Here are 10 ways to troubleshoot, fix, or just survive a slow internet connection.

* This story originally ran in June, 2013, and was updated with new information and additional reporting by Patrick Austin in August, 2017.**

Sometimes, your internet is slow because you’re only paying for slow internet . Log onto your provider’s web site (or give them a call) and find out what plan you have. Then, head on over to Speedtest.net and run a speed test. If the numbers match up to what you’re paying for, then your network is working fine and you’re just paying for slow internet—and the best way to speed it up will be to upgrade. (Though some of the below tricks will help you eke out a bit more speed). If the numbers don’t match, read on for a few ways to fix that problem.

As we sat in an enclosed patio section of a restaurant, we happened to notice a couple of zip lock baggies pinned to a post and a wall. The bags were half filled with water, each contained 4 pennies, and they were zipped shut. The owner told us that these baggies kept the flies away! We actually watched some flies come in the open window, stand around on the window sill, and then fly out again. And there were no flies in the eating area!

Sue: Many people swear that a zip-lock bag filled half-way with water and attached over entry-ways will repel flies. No one yet knows how or why it works, but there is speculation that it has something to do with the way the moving water refracts light.

Danielle Martin: Fill a ziplock bag with water and 5 or 6 pennies and hang it in the problem area. In my case it was a particular window in my home. It had a slight but significant passage way for insects. Ever since I have done that, it has kept flies and wasps away. Some say that wasps and flies mistake the bag for some sort of other insect nest and are threatened by this.

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Look on any ivermectin or moxidectin-based wormer packet and you’ll see a long list of parasites. Tucked in neatly at the end – it’s nearly always at the end – you’ll see the words Onchocerca Microfilariae, otherwise known as neck threadworms.

Also known as neck threadworms, these critters vary in length from 6cm to 30cm (think the length of a regular ruler). Astonishingly, they live in the horse’s nuchal ligament.

Yes, the nuchal ligament. It runs the full length of the neck, from poll to withers, with a flat ligament part connecting with the cervical vertebrae.

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Ways to repel horse flies
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