Why do magnets work better when they


Magnets have magnetic fields that attract items containing iron. For example, some of the substances attracted to magnets include iron, nickel, and steel. Magnets are used for a variety of purposes, ranging from attaching items to refrigerator doors and creating compasses to providing for fast roller coaster rides and converting mechanical energy into electrical energy . They are even used in some toys.

Understanding how magnets work means figuring out the dynamics of a magnetic field. Consider the space that surrounds a magnet. This space is occupied by a magnetic force and is called a magnetic field. If a magnet is placed within this field, it will be acted upon by magnetic forces .

A magnetic field is created as the result of moving charges. A good example of this is electric current that flows through a wire. When this occurs, there are negatively charged, subatomic particles, called electrons, moving through the wire. As these charges move, a magnetic field forms around the wire. Likewise, the magnetic field of a magnet is created by the movement of electrons.

Once you learn not to crush creations with your giant fingers, Micromagnets are undeniably enjoyable. Like other magnet spheres, Micromagnets have unique and inimitable characteristics so valuable in research, teaching, tactile therapy, and art. Creative energy is flame that can be stoked bigger, or wasted away.

A busy mind will see 432 Micromagnets as a great short-term imagination outlet in the workplace. A focused spirit with a set of 1728 Micromagnets will find countless hours of challenge, and a smart medium of creative expression.

The thin film will appear lighter when magnetic field lines are parallel to the film, and darker when magnetic field lines are mostly perpendicular to the surface.

The magnetic state (or magnetic phase) of a material depends on temperature and other variables such as pressure and the applied magnetic field. A material may exhibit more than one form of magnetism as these variables change.

Magnetism was first discovered in the ancient world, when people noticed that lodestones , naturally magnetized pieces of the mineral magnetite , could attract iron. [1] The word magnet comes from the Greek term μαγνῆτις λίθος magnētis lithos , [2] "the Magnesian stone, [3] lodestone." In ancient Greece, Aristotle attributed the first of what could be called a scientific discussion of magnetism to the philosopher Thales of Miletus , who lived from about 625 BC to about 545 BC. [4] Around the same time, in ancient India , the Indian surgeon Sushruta was the first to make use of the magnet for surgical purposes. [5]

Alexander Neckam , by 1187, was the first in Europe to describe the compass and its use for navigation. In 1269, Peter Peregrinus de Maricourt wrote the Epistola de magnete , the first extant treatise describing the properties of magnets. In 1282, the properties of magnets and the dry compass were discussed by Al-Ashraf, a Yemeni physicist , astronomer , and geographer . [9]

­It all started when we went shopping for a magnet for a demonstration on liquid body armor . We wanted to show that a magnetic field could cause certain liquids to behave as solids. Along with the petri dishes and iron filings we needed, the Steve Spangler Science catalog had a neodymium magnet it described as "super strong." We ordered our supplies, hoping that the magnet would be powerful enough to create an effect we could capture on film.

The magnet didn't just transform our iron-and-oil fluid into a solid -- sometimes, its pull on the fluid cracked the petri dish holding it. Once, the magnet unexpectedly flew out of a videographer's hand and into a dish full of dry filings, which required considerable ingenuity to remove. It also adhered itself so firmly to the underside of a metal table that we had to use a pair of locking pliers to retrieve it. When we decided it would be safer to keep the magnet in a pocket between takes, people wound up momentarily stuck to the table, a ladder and the studio door.

Around the office, the magnet became an object of curiosity and the subject of impromptu experiments. Its uncanny strength and its tendency to suddenly and noisily jump from unwary grips to the nearest metal surface got us thinking. We all knew the basics of magnets and magnetism -- magnets attract specific metals, and they have north and south poles . Opposite poles attract each other while like poles repel. Magnetic and electrical fields are related, and magnetism, along with gravity and strong and weak atomic forces, is one of the four fundamental forces in the universe.

A chime doorbell uses a specialized sort of electromagnet called a solenoid . A solenoid is just an electromagnet where the coiled wire surrounds a metal piston . The piston contains magnetically conductive metal, so it can be moved backward or forward by the electromagnetic field. Press the button in the diagram below to see how this works.

The common chime design uses a solenoid to hit two tone bars in sequence. Press the button to see how this system works.

In this design, the solenoid piston consists of an iron core mounted to a non-magnetic metal bar. When there is no power to the electromagnet, a spring pushes the piston to the left, and the iron core extends outside of the wire coil. When you turn the electromagnet on (by pressing the doorbell button), the iron core is drawn to the magnetic field, so it slides into the center of the coiled wire.

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Magnets have magnetic fields that attract items containing iron. For example, some of the substances attracted to magnets include iron, nickel, and steel. Magnets are used for a variety of purposes, ranging from attaching items to refrigerator doors and creating compasses to providing for fast roller coaster rides and converting mechanical energy into electrical energy . They are even used in some toys.

Understanding how magnets work means figuring out the dynamics of a magnetic field. Consider the space that surrounds a magnet. This space is occupied by a magnetic force and is called a magnetic field. If a magnet is placed within this field, it will be acted upon by magnetic forces .

A magnetic field is created as the result of moving charges. A good example of this is electric current that flows through a wire. When this occurs, there are negatively charged, subatomic particles, called electrons, moving through the wire. As these charges move, a magnetic field forms around the wire. Likewise, the magnetic field of a magnet is created by the movement of electrons.

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Why do magnets work better when they
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