Malaria lifecycle


The malaria parasite requires specific human and mosquito tissues to complete its life cycle. Once inside a human, the parasite develops and multiplies, causing periodic bouts of flu-like symptoms, including fever, headache, and chills. The developing parasites destroy red blood cells, which may cause death by severe anemia as well as by the clogging of capillaries that supply the brain or other vital organs with blood. The deadliest of the four species of the parasite is Plasmodium falciparum , a species most likely to be transmitted by the mosquito Anopheles gambiae .

The genomes of humans, A. gambiae , and P. falciparum have recently been sequenced, and hopefully this information will point the way to new avenues of vaccination, treatment, or eradication of this disease. Click on the adjacent thumbnail for more information about the life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum within a mosquito and a human.

MALARIA is an integral part of the travel health consultation.  Below are some resources to help you understand more about the subject and some tools to help in the delivery of your pre travel care advice. 

Circular lifecycle graphic with four quadrants. The four quadrants represent the following steps in the research process: Plan and propose, setup, manage, and closeout. Plan and Propose includes the development of a sponsored research project to final proposal submission. Setup includes setting up the infrastructure for successful management of your award. Manage includes managing award funds, reporting, and post-award changes. Closeout includes final financial and research reporting, dissemination of data, and records retention.

Exciting research is taking place all over campus. Visit UW Today – Research to see what research is being featured.

The mainstay of malaria diagnosis has been the microscopic examination of blood, utilizing blood films . [1] Although blood is the sample most frequently used to make a diagnosis, both saliva and urine have been investigated as alternative, less invasive specimens. [2] More recently, modern techniques utilizing antigen tests or polymerase chain reaction have been discovered, though these are not widely implemented in malaria endemic regions. [3] [4] Areas that cannot afford laboratory diagnostic tests often use only a history of subjective fever as the indication to treat for malaria.

From the thick film, an experienced microscopist can detect parasite levels (or parasitemia ) as few as 5 parasites/ µL blood. [6] Diagnosis of species can be difficult because the early trophozoites ("ring form") of all four species look similar and it is never possible to diagnose species on the basis of a single ring form; species identification is always based on several trophozoites.

A new system, by www.foldscope.com provides a $1 paper microscope and centrifuge that can be deployed to rural areas in the third world.

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The malaria parasite requires specific human and mosquito tissues to complete its life cycle. Once inside a human, the parasite develops and multiplies, causing periodic bouts of flu-like symptoms, including fever, headache, and chills. The developing parasites destroy red blood cells, which may cause death by severe anemia as well as by the clogging of capillaries that supply the brain or other vital organs with blood. The deadliest of the four species of the parasite is Plasmodium falciparum , a species most likely to be transmitted by the mosquito Anopheles gambiae .

The genomes of humans, A. gambiae , and P. falciparum have recently been sequenced, and hopefully this information will point the way to new avenues of vaccination, treatment, or eradication of this disease. Click on the adjacent thumbnail for more information about the life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum within a mosquito and a human.

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Malaria lifecycle
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